International Women’s Strike – Muskoka

Being able to participate in a global movement is profoundly powerful. It’s important to be BRAVE and create the opportunities for discussion and change that you want to see. Of course, I say this now at thirty years old, but if you’d asked me five years ago if I’d ever do something like spearhead and speak at a rally for women’s rights, I would have laughed, then cried, then had an anxiety attack. And yes, all those things still happened, but I ALSO co-organized a strike. So to paraphrase Audre Lorde, when speaking and staying silent are both terrifying, decide to speak.

Video: Cogeco Interview for International Women’s Strike

Watch a 7minute interview by Melissa Cilliers from CogecoTV Muskoa. She interviewed me about the upcoming Women’s Strike, which is a global event with countless local iterations. I am helping organize the rally that is taking place in Muskoka on March 8th 2017.

Video: FACT, PROBLEM, SOLUTION: Canada’s UNFOUNDED Rape Cases

This video deals with the Globe and Mail’s new expose on Canada’s police precincts abuse of power and upholding of patriarchy by filing 1/5 rape cases as Unfounded. The Ontario Provincial Police’s stat is 34%. This type of bullshit creates an environment where rapists run RAMPANT because they know there are no repercussions. We have to make rape UNTHINKABLE.

Video: Canadian Women March on Washington

In this video: Jazzhands! But also, why women need to take over now, how we fucked up the animal world by calling it a kingdom aka ‘alpha’ bullshit, why women’s solidarity matters, and my experience at the Women’s March.

My first YouTube video

  So I’ve been thinking for some time about what it would look like if I had a youtube channel. Like most things in my life, this was not a simple or speedy decision. I have a number of reasons for being hesitant in doing this. I’m concerned about my own privacy and safety–radical feministsContinue reading “My first YouTube video”

Article: Women United! Two Muskokans march on Washington

It’s fascinating to be a part of a march so huge—you are immersed in your immediate surroundings, you can really only see and hear the nearest few hundred people. At the time we were told to anticipate 200,000 people, but to hear later the numbers had more than doubled to 500,000, and to see the photographs of a veritable sea of pink hats and protest signs, deeply humbled us. When we later learned women had marched on all seven continents, that we had joined the largest global protest in human history, we knew that the 31 cramped, antsy, and sleep-deprived hours on the bus had been worth it.