She Speaks: I envision a community in Muskoka for women, forever

This is the vision I have for Muskoka. A dedicated space for women – not a shelter, not transitional housing, not rentals, but a land held in trust, and homes created by and for the women who wish to live there. Homes that belong to them. A sense of ownership, pride, stability, security, community, respect.

She Speaks: Who Are You Really Mad At?

Every person has the opportunity to shift from blame and shame to courage and compassion. It’s become too easy to hand wash away the issues we face as a community – but the hard thing and the right thing are often the same.

Audio: Interview by Jo Jordon on Women’s March Muskoka

In Huntsville, meeting at the Huntsville Place Mall at 12:30pm. We’ll have some speakers, including myself, some merch, and other goodies. Then we march to end the oppression of women and in solidarity with marginalized people.

She Speaks: At last women are done being silent

Listen, things aren’t getting worse. They’re just getting louder. And so the attempts to drown out the truth increase in volume as well. We all get to decide who we hear, and who we don’t. No one is saying it’s easy. But for me, at least, it’s simple.

Blog: Rocky Horror and Actual Horror

Most of the rooms had labels for male prisoners, so it was really cool that the one we got had a placard for a woman – the owner of a house of ill-repute, no less. All of the other women’s labels talked about offenses like ‘keeping and untidy house’ and ‘vagrancy’, so you can see the misogyny here.

How Do You Solve a Problem Like Male Violence?

Patriarchy hurting men is like the negative side effects of a very effective drug. Men could just stop taking the drug – they could fight against patriarchy, they could opt out of the benefits, they could do the work to support women and uplift our voices and deny the undeserved power bestowed by millennia of near global male control. But with vanishingly few exceptions, men do not. They like the drug.

Blog: herstories; or How I Got a TV Show and What That’s Like

I was so nervous! I had a little notepad with questions on it and I read them faithfully, one by one. I was very quiet and awkward. Even though I interact with women all the time at my work, in my life, and volunteering, in basically the same type of setting (I love to ask questions and I’m very curious, so if I’m not careful I can accidentally interview people without even thinking about it!), I was overwhelmed by the camera and the knowledge that it was Very Important to be professional and sound good, etc.